How video games sucked millions of seniors in

Older Americans refuse to say “game over.”

Millions of seniors across the country are spending big bucks on video games, saying they help keep their brains stimulated and bond with younger family members.

The findings come from a new survey published Tuesday by gaming website FandomSpot. The surprising results challenge the widely held stereotype that video games are only played by teenagers.

“Older people don’t just want to sit on the porch and watch the leaves fall, they want to have fun,” FandomSpot’s Alyssa Celatti said in a statement provided to The Post. “This study may even encourage older people to try the game for some of the benefits cited by their peers.”

The site surveyed 1,000 video game players aged 65 and older and found that almost half had spent at least $500 in the past year on consoles, games and accessories.

More than three-quarters of respondents said games helped them maintain “a healthier, younger mind,” while 76% said it made it easier to connect with family and friends. This discovery also refutes the cliché that video games promote isolation and antisocial behavior.

Grandfather and Gamer: FandomSpot surveyed 1,000 video game players aged 65 and older. Nearly half of them have spent at least $500 in the past year on consoles, games and accessories.
Getty Images/Westend61

Additionally, about half of respondents said video games actually helped improve their mental health.

In 2019, a study conducted by AARP determined that video games were booming among Americans 50 and older. The organization found that the number of older gamers increased from 40.2 million in 2016 to 50.6 million in 2019.

The ensuing coronavirus pandemic and strict stay-at-home orders have likely prompted millions of older Americans to take up the game, with seniors telling FandomSpot investigators that electronics have helped alleviate their boredom.

While 58% of respondents said they played video games on a PlayStation, a majority of seniors also enjoyed gaming time on their smartphones.
While 58% of respondents said they play video games on a PlayStation, a majority of seniors have also enjoyed gaming time on their smartphones.
Tima Miroshnichenko

Nintendo’s “Animal Crossing” has become a beloved video game during the pandemic, turning into a popular pastime for some seniors scared to venture outdoors for fear of catching the coronavirus.

The Post spoke with a video game designer who helped his 88-year-old grandmother get hooked on the game.

Meanwhile, the FandomSpot survey also revealed that high-violence “Call of Duty” video games were popular among American seniors.

And while 58% of respondents said they play video games on a PlayStation, a majority of seniors also swipe playtime on their smartphones.

Online puzzle Wordle was the second most popular game for Americans over 65, while Candy Crush took the top spot.

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